Fusion, Chalk & Milk Paint – What’s the difference?

I get asked this question all the time and thought I’d do a post to answer that question for all of my readers.  Although I have used all of the above, I have to be totally honest with you, I do prefer Fusion, not because I’m a retailer but because it fits my style.  I think everyone who paints has their own style and vision.  Fusion just happens to fit my overall vision for my pieces.   I do think there are pieces that other products fit the bill and I do enjoy changing things up from time to time.

Below I’ve listed the differences, both pros and cons, so that you can make your own decision about what fits your style and vision.

Milk Paint:

Pros

  • little need to prime or strip surfaces – very little prep required.
  • self levelling, meaning you won’t see brush marks – the paint levels as you apply it to the surface.
  • very quick drying – dries to a porous, chalky finish.
  • needs to be sealed with a wax or a finishing oil for best results.
  • can be used on many surfaces, but will often result in a naturally chippy or flakey finish on more glossy or certain types of surfaces, unless a bonding agent is added.
  • can be sanded back and distressed very easily for an authentic chippy or aged patina.
  • only have to mix as much as required for each project.
  • all natural, not harmful ingredients.
  • 2-3 coats needed for good coverage.
  • middle of the road on affordability
  • wash brushes out with water.

Cons

  • Mixing and determining correct amount for projects can be tricky.
  • May require more coats for full coverage

Fusion Mineral Paint

Pros

  • no need to prime or strip surfaces – very little prep required.
  • self levelling – you won’t see brush marks – paint levels as you apply it to a surface.
  • very quick drying – dries to a satin – matte finish
  • NO need for top coat – built in top coat means no waxing is necessary, but wax can still be applied if you prefer more of a sheen.
  • sticks to most surfaces, as the name (Fusion) suggests.
  • paint will not separate or harden in the container for 7 years
  • non-toxic, lead free, virtually odourless and very low volatile organic compounds (VOC), contains no ammonia or formaldehyde.
  • can be sanded and distressed, best if done soon after painting rather than later before paint cures.
  • 1-2 coats for good coverage.
  • wash brushes out in water.
  • Very affordable

Cons

  • Harder to distress after paint has cured.
  • Not a chalky finish which some people prefer.

Chalk Paint

Pros

  • little need to prime or strip surfaces
  • sticks to just about any surface – wood, concrete, metal, matt plastic, earthenware and more, inside and outside the home.
  • dries quickly to a chalky matte finish.
  • brush strokes can create great texture, which works well with dark wax to age patina.
  • needs to be finished or sealed with a wax or finishing oil for best results.
  • 2 coats gives good coverage.
  • wash brushes out in water.

Cons

  • Waxing over chalk paint will wear off over time and require reapplication.
  • If chalk paint is left unsealed or wax has worn off, the paint will start wearing off with everyday use.  Sitting just a glass of water that sweats on the finish can dissolve the paint.
  • Contains levels of volatile organic compounds that can be toxic.
  • Most brands tend to be expensive

Get free shipping over $80 on Fusion here

Blessings,

Selina

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